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Archives - February 2009

How are graphic novels viewed in libraries across the country today? While attitudes toward graphic novels and manga are changing, and librarians were among the first to change them, we wanted to learn more about how the formats are received and perceived today. So we asked some librarians to share their experiences. Their responses were fascinating.
February 4, 2009

An Award for Toon Books

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Congratulations to Toon Books for winning the coveted Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor from the American Library Association. Toon Books was founded by Françoise Mouly, who is the art editor for The New Yorker, and Art Spiegelman (legendary creator of Maus) to supply age-appropriate graphic novels for kids four and older. They won the award for the book Stinky by Eleanor Davis.
February 3, 2009

For Those of You Who Missed the Con

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New York Comic-Con was last weekend. This is an event that has been going on since 2006 and growing steadily every year. It’s a crowded, joyful, exuberant, energy-filled weekend where fans, creators, and about 75,000 other people associated with the industry can meet up. It’s beyond fun.
New York Comic-Con was last weekend. This is an event that has been going on since 2006 and growing steadily every year. It’s a crowded, joyful, exuberant, energy-filled weekend where fans, creators, and about 75,000 other people associated with the industry can meet up. It’s beyond fun.
Whenever I wander into a bookstore, which happens to occur quite frequently, I seek out the comics, the graphic novels, and the manga sections immediately. And although I might be there to see what is new, I often find myself taking time to talk to the many young readers scattered in those particular aisles.
I meant to blog about this days ago, but time got away from me. Just wanted to say congratulations to the folks who put on the Graphica in Education conference at Fordham University this past weekend. That includes Diamond Book Distributors, Random House Academic Marketing, and ViziPress, as well as all the speakers, panelists, and presenters. I particularly enjoyed the session “Sequential Art, Writing, and Self: From Image to Text and Back Again.” It was held by Michael Gianfrancesco, a high-school English teacher in Rhode Island, and Jenn Cook, a professor at Rhode Island College. It was fascinating to see how comics were not only gaining acceptance from teachers (something that would have been unfathomable when I was in school) but also being successfully used as a great tool for education.